25
September

Rod’s Replay Insider: What do you want to get out of your replay?

oldboardI have exciting news!  Rod Caborn (who has plenty of experience with APBA replays) has offered to write a series of articles on the topic of how to get the most out of your APBA replay! 

Here is his first installment.  – Tom

What’s your reason for wanting to undertake a time-consuming, patience-testing, administratively challenging replay?

Are you simply looking to play APBA baseball games and experience an exciting pennant race? Play a “What if” replay that matches teams from different seasons. Maybe integrate teams from pre-1947 and see what kind of a difference the Negro League players might have made. Learn in-depth about the players from a certain season or era.

Do you want to create entirely new teams and rosters (e.g. an off-season Winter League with six teams)? Find out what would have happened if certain trades had been made (e.g. Ted Williams for Joe DiMaggio, rumored to have been discussed after WWII)?

Do you want to conduct a full-season replay? An abbreviated season that takes less time?

When it comes to defining the reasons APBA fans undertake replays, no two answers are ever quite the same. And no two replays are exactly alike. Nor do they have to be alike.

Replays can take any form you want. There is no one way to do a replay and no one way is correct.  Keep in mind, the only person you have to please is yourself.

Replays are meant to be fun. Whatever kind of replay you undertake, do it your way. And do it for the sole purpose of adding to your enjoyment of baseball.

Next: What’s required to undertake a replay?

Posted by: | Category: replay | Tags: , , | 14 comments

23
September

Weird Card Wednesday: 1951 Eddie Gaedel

eddie gaedel

Howie Mooney posted this Eddie Gaedel from 1951 on Facebook.  I don’t think I’ve ever seen it before.  Most Weird Wednesday columns I write describe the strangeness of the card but there’s no doubt that the whole situation of Bill Veeck’s decision to pinch hit with 3’7” Eddie Gaedel had a aura of oddity surrounding it. 

“Eddie came to us in a moment of desperation,” recalled St. Louis Browns owner Bill Veeck. “Not his desperation, ours.”

Most baseball fans know the story of Eddie Gaedel.  In grandstanding fashion (he popped out of a seven-foot cake), he played in just one game for the St. Louis Browns. 

He walked in his only appearance and never appeared in another game. 

Split G GS PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG
1951 Totals 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0   1.000  
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/23/2015.

 

It’s easier to count those numbers that aren’t 14s than those that aren’t.  He has a total of twenty-four 14s leaving four standard groundouts (26-29), three flyouts (30-32), a 12-25, a 54-12, a 44-40 a 53-16 and a 65-35. 

There are those out there (including me sometimes) that just want to exclaim, “why doesn’t APBA give him thirty-six 14s and be done with it?”.  I guess I understand the cardmakers sentiment.  There are those who would abuse cards like that.  If APBA was to go through the trouble of making a card for Gaedel though, it might be a case for an exception. 

By the way, for those wanting a good in-depth bio of Eddie Gaedel, check out Brian McKenna’s write-up on sabr.org.

thanks, Howie!

Posted by: | Category: Card Analysis | Tags: , , | 1 comment

22
September

Terrible Card Tuesday: 1966 Bob Watson

IMAG0256-002

The question was asked recently on Facebook’s APBA Baseball group, “Why would APBA have even produced a card for a player who made only a single plate appearance?”  The comment was made about some other player but being in the middle of a 1966 replay (in hiatus at the time), I’m well familiar with these kind of cards.  The 1966 card set is full of them.  My response was that these cards are for those who do full season replays and wish to incorporate every player. 

Houston’s Bob Watson who was no slouch as a player once he was given playing time, is one example.  1966 was his first year in the majors but the Houston Astros didn’t give him much of a chance till the next year.  He pinch hit in one game and never took the field. 

There’s no point in displaying his stats.  One game, one at-bat. To me, the most interesting thing about this is that APBA chose to give him a reasonably decent card (6-7-7-8-8-8-8-9-9, one 14) for a hitter who batted .000.  There are countless of players who have given their blood and sweat for their teams only to receive worse cards.  Just to pick one out of bunch, here’s 1987 Andre Thornton, for example. 

I had a theory that perhaps APBA was going on Watson’s future in big leagues (it was a far-fetched theory).  However, Watson’s 1966 case is similar to Dave Adlesh also from the 1966 set.  Adlesh went 0 for 6 and received hit numbers 6-7-8-8-9-9.  It’s not quite as good as Watson’s but still raises an eyebrow. 

Posted by: | Category: Card Analysis | Tags: , , | 2 comments

21
September

Monster Card Monday: 1948 Ted Williams

1948 ted williams

Along with Babe Ruth and Rogers Hornsby, I’ve probably done more Monster Card Monday columns on Ted Williams than anyone.  He was actually the first official one I did.  When Pastor Rich posted this 1948 Williams card on Facebook, I double checked to make sure I hadn’t written one up on it.  Nope. 

By the way, Rich was pretty excited about getting this card along with the rest of the 1948 Red Sox from Ken Schulz who sent the team to him.  Rich is on his way to building his collection.  It’s no coincidence that he’s such a resource when it comes to Monster Cards!

Pretty much any Williams card you pick will be a Monster card even when he is injured.  His 1948 season is no exception.  That year, he led the AL in hitting (.369), slugging (.615) and on base average (.497).  On top of that, he paced the league with 44 doubles and 126 walks. His homerun power was slightly down with 25 dingers (he led the AL the year before and the year after). 

Williams only struck out 41 times for a BB/K ratio of more than 3:1. 

Split G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG
1948 Totals 137 638 509 124 188 44 3 25 127 4 126 41 .369 .497 .615
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/21/2015.

 

Without sounding too cynical, this is a typical Ted Williams APBA card.  He’s got power numbers, a good amount of hit numbers, lots of 14s, and an absence of 13s. 

His four powers of 1-5-6-6 aren’t super by Ted Williams’ standard but do the trick.  However, his .369 batting average gives him three 7s all the way out to 15.  Historically, one of Thumper’s best assets is his ability to get on base and this card doesn’t let us down.  It has a total of seven 14s. 

How many 13s does Williams’ 1948 card have?  Zero. 

One nitpick:  I’m surprised that Williams doesn’t have two 31s.  The one player who made it his life’s goal to perfect hitting the ball should have at least two, shouldn’t he? 

Fun numbers:  15-7, 21-14, 24-14

Check out Ted Williams’ other Monster Card Monday columns I’ve done. 

1941 | 1953 | 1955 | 1957

Thanks Rich (and Ken)!

Posted by: | Category: Card Analysis | Tags: , , | 1 comment

19
September

BBW and AIM: Why is Old Hoss Radbourn so tired?

Scott Fennessy has run into a bit of trouble in his 1883 APBA Baseball for Windows replay:

Wanted some advice.  I was cruising along on my 1883 season when the inevitable happens.  Once again, despite picking 19th century stamina, many pitchers, including Charles Radbourn, who pitched over 600 innings that SEASON have been injured.  In the Cubs case, which is where my dilemma is.  Starting Catcher injured, no problem.  I move my one and only reserve player into the outfield and put the outfielder into the catchers spot where he is rated. 

Now, problem two.  BOTH starting pitchers are injured.  Despite the fact that both started and went the distance 50 times, are injured for more than ten games each in less than a month.  Great job APBA, now I literally don’t have any players, and there are no other players available.

So my question to you is do I just create a player and just not use his stats so I can muddle my way through the season?  Or do I reboot the season and toss my efforts?  If it’s option b, how do I abort a season and start a new one?  I don’t see anything in the guide for that.

First of all, I am a little surprised that two pitchers who pitched 50+ complete games and I am assuming are rated J-0 were injured for 10 games by BBW.  Or maybe I’m not.  Looking through the APBA BBW help file, I did find this illuminating tidbit:

In general, pitchers injuries will occur more often and for a longer duration than batters.  Most importantly, A.I.M. injuries are irrespective of J-Rating.  An abused J0 has the same chance of injury as an abused J4!

When this kind of thing happens in modern day baseball replay, we can shake it off.  But when it happens in a replay like Scott’s 1883 replay when there is literally just two other pitchers on the Providence roster, it has definite repercussions.  Old Hoss Radbourn who essentially pitched 632 of the Providence’s 871 innings in 1883.  Call it abuse but it’s what happened in the era of deadball. 

Name W L W-L% ERA G GS CG SHO IP H BB SO BF
Old Hoss Radbourn 48 25 .658 ERA: 2.05FIP: 2.67Dif: -0.62">2.05 76 68 66 4 632.1 563 56 315 2540
Charlie Sweeney 7 7 .500 ERA: 3.13FIP: 3.44Dif: -0.31">3.13 20 18 14 0 146.2 142 28 48 626
Lee Richmond* 3 7 .300 ERA: 3.33FIP: 4.13Dif: -0.80">3.33 12 12 8 0 92.0 122 27 13 416
Team Totals 58 39 .598 ERA: 2.37FIP: 2.95Dif: -0.58">2.37 98 98 88 4 871.0 827 111 376 3582
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/19/2015.

 

Now as for what Scott can do… it may be too late for this but there is a solution. He might want to make sure that his Advanced Injury Management (AIM) is set for 19th century baseball.  If it’s set for the default, it’s no wonder Old Hoss is getting dog tired. 

image

You can get to this window from APBA Baseball League Manager –> A.I.M. –> A.I.M. Schedule and Rules.  It’s probably best, especially in Scott’s case, do this before the season starts but hindsight is 20/20. 

I’m 80% sure this will solve your problem, Scott.  Poor Radbourn, he was pitching as if he was in today’s MLB baseball.  Even Clayton Kershaw would be on DL.  Scott, if I wasn’t too far into your replay, I would start over and make the A.I.M change to 19th century baseball.  If you want however, you can change it mid-replay and it will take effect. 

Hope that helps!

Posted by: | Category: Computer APBA | Tags: , , , | 6 comments

15
September

Terrible Card Tuesday: 1975 Tom Kelly

terrible_tuesday_tom_kelly_min_twins_xb_1975

Jim Fraasch took time out from planning the Neil Ess Memorial Twin Cities APBA Baseball Tournament to nominate a Terrible Tuesday card.  Of course knowing Jim, his submission is a Minnesota Twins legend. 

Two-time World Series champion Twins manager Tom Kelly played just one year in the majors before he realized he could contribute more with his coaching skills.  Drafted by the Seattle Pilots, he finally got his shot for the Twins as a first baseman in 1975.  Unfortunately, he hit like a utility shortstop batting just .181 in 127 at-bats. 

He hit five doubles and even hit a tater.  He collected 15 walks but his OBP (.262)and SLG (.244) were not of firstbaseman’s caliber and couldn’t upend other Twins firstbasemen like John Briggs or Craig Kusick.  In fact, the Twins moved Rod Carew to first base the very next year. 

Split G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG
1975 Totals 49 147 127 11 23 5 0 1 11 0 15 22 .181 .262 .244
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/15/2015.

 

Nothing exciting about Tom Kelly’s card at all.  In fact, his 25-37 is cringe-worthy.  For an AL firstbaseman to have an 11-7 over a sample size of 147 plate appearances, it makes me happy that Minnesota had a decent pitching staff that year. 

Ugly numbers: 25-37, 11-7, 33-8

The rest was history for T.K.  He took over as manager of the Twins midseason in 1986.  Twice in the next five years, he won World Series championships. 

Kelly retired in 2001 on a positive note, a second place finish for the Twins with a 85-77 record.  He recorded 1140 wins in 16 years all with the Minnesota Twins. 

thanks Jim!!

Posted by: | Category: Card Analysis | Tags: , , | 1 comment

15
September

October 3rd Twin Cities tourney divisions are set

tct

The kind of crazy fun you expect at TCABT: Rollin’ at the last tourney

The Neil Ess Memorial Twin Cities APBA Baseball Tournament – IV is almost here.  It takes place in just a few weeks on October 3rd in Organizer Jim Fraasch has got everything under control with a total of 26 teams participating. 

Jim sends the final division lineup for the TCABT-IV.  
 

TCABT-IV

Saturday, October 3rd, 2015

HARMON KILLEBREW DIVISION (D1)

1999 DIAMONDBACKS (BRUCE TYLER)

1961 YANKEES (GARY BORTHWICK)

1968 TIGERS (BILL LILLEY)

1937 YANKEES (LEROY ARNOLDI)

1911 ATHLETICS (CRAIG CHRISTIAN)

1971 ORIOLES (JOE PAVLICEK)

 

KENT HRBEK DIVISION (D2)

1974 ATHLETICS (KURT BERGLAND)

1989 CUBS (BEN LOFGREN)

1905 GIANTS (JEFF BOEDING)

1963 TWINS (JIM FRAASCH)

 

BOB ALLISON DIVISION (D3)

1982 BREWERS (RUSS CRUFF)

1989 GIANTS (ROB SKOGEN)

1906 CUBS (ERIC BERG)

1977 DODGERS (GEORGE ADAMS)

 

JUSTIN MORNEAU DIVISION (D4)

1989 ATHLETICS (BEAU LOFGREN)

2006 TWINS (SCOTT ELLINGWORTH)

1980 YANKEES (GREGG NELSON)

2013 RED SOX (CHRIS SHORES)

 

TONY OLIVA DIVISION (D5)

1986 METS (PHIL GERAFFO)

1969 ORIOLES (FRED JOHNSON)

1964 CARDINALS (ROGER PARSONS)

2011 YANKEES (CLEON PAVLICEK)

 

TORII HUNTER DIVISION (D6)

2004 CARDINALS (DARRELL SKOGEN)

1976 REDS (PAUL VAN BEEK)

2011 RANGERS (KEVIN CLUFF)

1922 BROWNS (DAN SKILLINGS)

I’m loving the creative ways that tournaments these days are naming their divisions and making it relevant to their local venue.  

There is plenty of variety of teams in TCABT-IV.  Aside from the ‘40’s and ‘50s, every decade of baseball from 1900 to the present is represented. 

It’s worth noting that Bill Lilley is using the 1968 Tigers for the third straight time in tournament play.  He won the championship at the Chicagoland tourney in the summer but in Toledo in the Glass City Tournament, the Tigers rested on their laurels and went 0-6.  It will be interesting to see how they fare up north. 

Good luck to Jim (who of course, picked the 1963 Twins) and everyone participating!! 

Posted by: | Category: Tournament | Tags: , , | 2 comments

14
September

Monster Card Monday: 1883 Dave Orr

1883 Orr

Another from Scott Fennessy’s 1883 BBW replay.  This is Dave Orr from the New York Metropolitans.  Orr is probably best known for hitting 52 triples in two straight seasons including 31 in 1886. 

The 1883 season was Orr’s second in the American Association and he was still getting his feet wet.  Overall, he hit .320 but for the Metropolitans, he hit .320 with four doubles, three triples and two homers in 50 at-bats. 

Year G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB BA OBP SLG
1883 13 50 50 6 16 4 3 2 11 0 .320 .320 .640
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/14/2015.
 

 

Dave Orr’s 1883 card is a foreshadowing of what was to come as his power numbers are 1-2-2-5-6-6.  While his hit numbers are quite high for a .320 hitter (he has a 15-7), he has no 14s justifying the higher hit value. 

No batters’ strikeouts were recorded in the American Association in 1883 that I know but Orr has no 13s on his card either.  So any outs you see will be ground outs and fly outs.  As a result, Orr has some unusual fly out results like 36-30 and 24-30 and 64-30. 

Fun numbers:  11-2, 33-2, 55-6

On a related note,  last week’s Tripp Sigman column prompted a friendly comment from reader Bob Stanton:

“This card like so many others should appear on Freaky Friday or Weird Wednesday. For me at least posting cards like this demeans truly awesome seasons. Take a look at Chuck Klein and Lefty O’Doul two members of the 1929 Phillies who had had awesome seasons. Sure Sigman has a better card but come on rank the players.”

To be honest, Bob isn’t the first person to raise this.  When I started Monster Card Monday way back when, it was the intention to celebrate the APBA card not necessarily the player himself.  I rationalize it this way… I don’t want to make it personal when I post a Terrible Tuesday card.  The card is terrible not the player who played so hard to get to the big leagues.

But let’s face it, baseball fans and APBA players want to read about the heroes and the good guys not the lucky ones, not the “Tripp Sigmans” of the game we love. 

I do appreciate the comment, Bob.  Monster Card Monday has been one of the most popular features of this blog so in the future, I’ll do my best to post the Chuck Kleins and Babe Ruths every Monday. 

Don’t be surprised if you see a Chris Bando card every so often though! 

Thanks to Scott!!

Posted by: | Category: Card Analysis | Tags: , , , | 3 comments

13
September

We’re tripping over our good starts

image

Just waiting for Shawn Baier’s Panthers to fall

My APBA league teams need to learn to follow through on their successes. Once we have a good thing going, don’t let go. 

Two nights ago I played a home series against Robert Mosher’s Fairgrove Tigers in the Boys of Summer League.  The Urbana Locomotives were finally hitting the ball and we won the first four.  Andrew Susac, by the way, hit a homer in his first career at-bat and threw out two batters in the game.  We were gunned for a sweep against the Tigers but BBW had other plans. Fairgrove won games 5 and 6 and we settled for a 4-2 series win. 

I’m not complaining.  My Urbana Locomotives have been all over the BoS National League East as low as last place and as high as second.  We’ve won 8 of our last 12 so we are heading in the right direction. 

brando pen

Brando makes a call to the pen.  He’d had enough of Kimbrel’s crap

Today was a big day as I got to play my buddy Brando and his Missoula Rattlesnakes for the Illowa APBA League.  Seeing as he lives in Montana and a 24 hour drive was out of the question, we decided to play over Skype. 

Boy, I had Brando on the ropes.  My Thunderchicken #1 and #2 hitters Jose Reyes were getting on base anyway they could and J.D Martinez was driving them home.  After three games, we had won every game.  We even managed to score the winning run off of Craig Kimbrel in game 1 without hitting the ball (BB, K, BB, K, BB, BB, BB). 

Then it hit us… The ‘Snakes made a statement in Game 4 by scoring 3 runs in their half of the first.  This time, it was off of Hyun-jin Ryu who has just come off a fantastic August including a no-hitter.  To make matters worse, the three-run rally was fueled by one of my draftees, Yasmani Grandal.  Bitter about being traded, I’m sure.  Ryu only lasted six innings and those three innings would be all that Brando needed to win that game.  In fact, Missoula pitching kept the Thunderchickens to two runs in each of the last three games and the Rattlesnakes tied the series up 3-3.

J.D Martinez was the big star of the series going 11 for 25 with three homeruns and seven rbis.  J.D. has been a welcome addition to the team since we acquired him this year.  He’s batting .298 with 19 homers and 43 rbis at the 102 game mark. 

The Thunderchicken fans are hoping to see J.D. participate in the 2015 IAL All-Star Game which will take place on October 10th. 

Posted by: | Category: League Updates | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

7
September

Monster Card Monday: 1929 Tripp Sigman

tripp sigman

Tony Stevens passed on this 1929 Tripp Sigman card.  Wesley Tripplett Sigman’s card is more than worthy of the Monster column.  A 13-8, whew!

But what makes this card all the more delicious is his playability.  Most Monster APBA cards I see like this are for players who went 1 for 2 or maybe 2 for 3.  Sigman maintained a .517 average for a total of 29 at-bats for the Philadelphia Phillies.  Not only that, he hit two homers and a double.

Split G GS PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG
1929 Totals 10 7 32 29 8 15 1 0 2 9 0 3 1 .517 .563 .759
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/7/2015.

 

Sigman’s card is pretty record breaking for somebody who had more than just a cup of coffee.  He was given an almost unheard of 24-9 and 42-7 to go with his 13-8.  He has a total of NINE sevens on his card to with his 1-1-6 power numbers.

Sigman’s hit numbers all laid out in a row:

1-1-6-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-8-8-8-9-9

Fun numbers:  42-7, 13-8, 24-9

Tripp Sigman made it back for the 1930 season and did “all right”.  He hit .324 with four homeruns in 100 at-bats for the famous last place Phillies.  After the 1930 season, Sigman hung up his spikes.

Thanks Tony!

Posted by: | Category: Card Analysis | Tags: , , | 7 comments

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